School Photos

Grammar & Primary School

Grammar & Primary School

Beals, ME

Approximately 1906 to 1907

Approximately 1906 to 1907

Front row L to R: James Urquhart, Jeanette Lowell, Ordessa Alley, Helen Beal, Charlotte Beal Burke, Gladys Dobbin, Freeman Beal, Vinaline Carver, Elva Kneeland, Clyde Peabody, Vernard Gould, Edmund Alley & Charlie Alley. Second row L to R: Vivian Alley, Vera Beal, Rhoda Alley, Alice Norton, Hattie Woodward, Martha Alley and Lewellyn Crowley. Back row L to R: Iva Beal, Verna Lowell, Thurman Beal (leaning),Alton Urquhart, Ewart Lenfestey, Vinton Beal, Teacher, Vesta Dobbin, Clarence Beal, Cordie N

1945-1946 Beals School, Grades 4-6th

1945-1946 Beals School, Grades 4-6th

Standing L to R: ?, Lyle Griffin, George Drisko, Clifford Alley, Stanley Beal, teacher, Hannah Kelley, Elliot Beal, Philmore Crowley, Hartley Alley, Alexis Fagonde, Jr., Niles Alley, and George Woodward. Seated: L to R: Wilfred Lenfestey, Barbara Alley, Betty Kelley, Bettina Carver, Sylvia Lenfestey, Deborah Seavey, Mabel Norton, Beverly Odion, Jeanne Anderson, and Warren Peabody.

BHS Class

BHS Class

Standing l to r: Osmond Beal, Douglas Peabody, Lorena Alley, Teacher, Sylvina Alley, Donald Backman, Jr, and Hartley Alley. Seated l to r: Lena Ray, Lois Merchant, Sylvia Lenfestey, Alverda Crowley, Betty Kelley and Bettina Carver.

1951 BHS Graduation

1951 BHS Graduation

Graduation held at Beals Weslyan Church. Seated l to r: Lorena Alley, Eleanor Smith, Carol Olton, Ann Olton, Jane Wallace and Amanda Alley. Standing l to r: Osmond Beal, Willard Kelley, Donald Backman, Jr., and Richard Carver.

1949 - 1950 BHS Class

1949 - 1950 BHS Class

(L to R) Back Row: Teacher & Boy's Coach, Thomas Longfellow, Alexis (Lecky) Fagonde, Jr., Lester (Bud) Alley, Elliot Beal, Velton Peabody, Douglas Peabody, Stanley Beal, and Hartley Alley. Middle Row: Beverly Odion, Lois Merchant, Alverda Crowley, Eleanor Norton, Barbara J Alley, Ethlyn Alley, Bettina Carver, Patricia Norton, Betty Kelley, Sylvia Lenfestey, Sylvina Alley, Principal. Front Row: Jessie Merchant, George Woodward, Harold Alley, Herman Eugene Merchant, Erwin Alley, & Harvey Alley

1948-1949 BHS Junior Public Speaking

1948-1949 BHS Junior Public Speaking

Standing l to r: Earl Peabody, Sylvia Lenfestey, Teacher, Sylvina Alley, Amanda Alley and Arthur Woodward. Front row l to r: Mabel Norton, Lorena Alley, Ena Gower, and Bettina Carver

Beals Elementary

Beals Elementary

Teacher Doris (Beal) Alley. Front row l to r: Esten Drisko, Edward Beal, Maynard Anderson, Jr., Guy Carver, Jr., Horace Peabody, and Verlan Lenfestey. Second row l to r: Louise Anderon, Elmer Beal, Blanche Hagan, Ruth Lenfestey, Chester Lenfestey, James Alley, and Ernestine Beal. Third row left to right: Linnie Griffin, Frances Alley, Dorothy Walker, Orletta Look, Willavie Lenfestey Beal, Norma Wilcox Backman, and Elaine Gould.

Beals Grammar School play cast;

Beals Grammar School play cast;

Seated l-r: Lester Alley, Patricia Norton,Eleanor Norton, Beverly Odiorne, Velton Peabody (holding "turkey" he baked in his grandmother's oven for the production; Erwin Alley; standing: Warren Peobody, Dick Alley, Ernest Libby Jr., Wilbur Alley, Elliot Beal, Alexis Fagonde Jr., Richard Alley, Jean Anderson, Ethelyn Alley, teacher Doris Alley; Iran Smith Sudio, probably 1950

1968 Ocean Breeze Class

1968 Ocean Breeze Class

Beals High School Class of 1948

Beals High School Class of 1948

L to R: Alverna Beal Williams, Edgar Drisko, Almena L.F. Alley, Lester Beal, Erroll Woodward, Susie Beal Johnson

Front row L to R: Verlan Lenfestey, Edward Beal, James Alley, Closson Alley, Jr., Almer Beal, Guy Carver, Ernest Kelley, Leamont Faulkingham and Ronald Beal Back row L to R: Teacher, Mr. Pettigrew, Addie Norton, Elaine Gould, Ernestine Beal, Ella Merchant, Marcia Woodward, and Ruth Lenfestey

Beals School Orchestra

Beals School Orchestra

Sports Photos

1929 - 1930 Beals High School Basketball Team

Seated l to r: Orrin Alley, Melrose Kent, Donald Alley, Erroll R. Woodward, and Donald Backman. Standing l to r: Farrell Lenfestey, Austin Alley, Ernest Legere, Principal/Coach, and Alfred Beal. Photo by Perry Studio, Bangor, Old Town and Millinocket.

1956 Beals Basketball Team

1926-1927 BHS Basketball Team

Standing l to r: Thurman Gould, Teacher, Mr. Huntington, Erroll Woodard Kneeling l to r: Bert Frost, Austin Alley, Donald Alley, Oscar Carver and Arnold Beal

1948 to 1949 BHS Cheerleaders

Top row l to r: Betty Kelley and Bettina Carver Middle row l to r: Mabel Norton, Sylvia Lenfestey and Nina Beal Bottom row l to r: Angelina Alley, Lorena Alley, Jane Wallace and Ena Gower.

Back: Edgar Drisko, Ernest Libby Jr., Alexis Fagonde Jr., Lester Alley, Erwin Alley

Back Row: Clinton Libby, Harleigh Alley, Vernon Peobody Bottom Row- Oscar Norton, Orman Alley, Isaac Beal, Almer Peabody

1951 Boys High School Basketball

Back: Coach Ordman Alley, Maurice Alley, Jackie Backman, Earlon Beal, Mariner Bunker, Larry Crowley, Anthony Beal, Farrell Beal, Scot Beal, Osmond Faulkingham, Donnie Beal, Front: Guy Kent, Park Burkey, Wayne Beal, Dana Beal, Leland Faulkingham

From 1901 Jonesport Town Report:

SCHOOL STATISTICS. Whole No. scholars in town 830 Indian River, Dist. No. 1. Spring term taught by Viola Crowley at $6 per week No. registered 20 Average 17 Fall term taught by Mamie Cummings at $6 per week No. registered 15 Average 10 The low average in this term is due to the fact that 4 scholars left and went to the Addison High School. Winter term taught by Elmer Crowley at $6 per week No. registered 14 Average 13 West Jonesport Primary, No. 2. Spring term taught by Mrs. Nettie Leighton at $9 per week No. registered 64 Average 56 Fall term taught by Mrs. Carrie Drisko at $9 per week No. registered 60 Average 50.7 Winter term taught by Carolyn Maloon at $9 per week No. registered 56 Average 46 West Jonesport Grammar. 9. Spring term taught by E. E. Turner at $55 per month No. registered 3 9 Average 3 4 TOWN OK JONESPORT. 33 10. Fall term taught by Mrs. D. D. Kelley at $36 per month No. registered 42 Average 37 8. Winter term taught by Edville Roys at $45 per month No registered 46 Average 34.8 Jonesport Primary. 9. Spring term taught by Edna Beal at $9 per week No. registered 58 Average 53 10. Fall term taught by Edna Beal at $9 per week No. registered 58 Average 50.6 8. Winter term taught by Edna Beal at $9 per week No. registered 58 Average 48.8 Jonesport Grammar School Dist. No. 3. 9. Spring term taught by Edgar A Worcester at $55 per mo. No. Registered 58 Average attendance 54 10. Fall term taught by Edgar A.Worcester at $55 per mo. No. Registered 55 Average attendance 46 8. Winter term taught by Edgar A. Worcester at $55 per mo. No. Registered 57 Average attendance 50 Lower Bay Dist. No. 4. 9. Spring term taught by Hattie Peasley at $5.00 per week Whole No. Registered 27 Average 20 10. Fall term taught by Olivia Kelley at $6.00 per week Whole No. Registered 19 Average 18 34 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 8. Winter term taught by Viola Smith at $6.00 per week Whole No. Registered 20 Average 15 Upper Bay Diet. No. 5. 9. Spring term taught by E. E. Farnsworth at $30 per mo. Whole No. Registered 43 Average 41.2 10. Fall term taught by Porter Doyle at $30 per mo. Whole No. Registered 49 Average 35-5 8. Winter term taught by Porter Doyle at $30 per rno. Whole No. Registered 44 Average 4313-19 Kelley's Pfc. Dist. No. < 3. 8. Spring term taught by Frank White at $30 per mo. Whole No. Registered 4 2 Average 38 10. Fall term taught by E. E. Turner at $36 per mo. No. Registered 37 Average 36 1-12 10. Winter term taught by E. E. Turner at $48 per mo. Whole No. Registered 47 Average 41 9-11 Head Harbor Dist. No. 7. 12. Spring term taught by Lizzie Kelley at $6.00 per week Whole No. Registered 2 3 Average 15 10. Fall term taught by Eugenia Wilson at $6.00 per week Whole No. Registered 2 2 Average 17 7. Winter term taught by Miss Wilson at $6.00 per week Whole No Registered 19 Average '7 TOWN OF JONESPORT. Alley's Bay Dist. No. 8. 9. Spring term taught by Porter Doyle at $30 per mo. Whole No Registered 32 Average 31 10. Fall term taught by Belle McKenzie at $6.00 per week Whole No. Registered 33 Average 32 33-50 8. Winter term taught by Belle McKenzie at $6.00 per week Whole No. Registered 32 Average 30 35-40 Beal's Island Primary Dist. No. 9. 9. Spring term taught by Olivia Kelley at $7.50 per week Whole No. Registered 47 40 10. Fall term taught by Annie Norton at *6.oo per week 47 40 at *6.oo per week Whole No. Registered 4 0 Average 32 8. Winter term taught by Auntie Norton at $56.00 per week Whole No. Registered 31 Average 24 Beal's Island Grammar, Tist. No. 9. 9. Spring term taught by Charles Perkins $44.50 Whole No. registered 33 Average 3° n - 5 ° 11. Fall term taught by Laura Rogers at $7.50 per week Whole No. registered 33 Average 3° n-5 ° Winter term taught by Laura Rogers at $7.50 per week Whole No. registered 33 Average 32 1-17 36 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE Slate Island, Dist. No. 10. 13. Spring term taught by Viola Smith at $6.00 per week Whole No. registered '7 Average *5 10. Fall term taught by Viola Smith at $6,< DO per week Whole No. registered 17 Average 14.6 Roque Island. Taught by Bertha Hanscom and Lillian Foster at $3 week Whole No. and average 4 Length of school year. Jonesport High School. 10. Spring term taught by H. C. Wilbur al : $85 month Whole No. registered 59 Average 3*-7 10. Fall term taught by Clarence Park at : $75 month Whole No. registered 47 Average 4i 10. Winter term taught by Lincoln Royce at $75 month Whole No. registered 45 Average 3.

From the 1905 Jonesport Census:

EDUCATIONAL ITEMS. 

The school history of the town of Jonesport covers a long and interesting period. As a whole, her citizens are proud of the record that is handed down. The town's representatives who have entered various phases of work in outside fields, speak well for their home training. 

In the early beginning of our town, school houses were not provided. Each parent was supposed to have a room where the teacher would come and instruct his children and others who met there. Usually some family, which had an unusually large room, offered their hospitality for this purpose. This school instruction was carried on by the "board around" system, when the instructor received very low wages, probably paid in boards and shingles, and was obliged to journey from one house to another for lodging. 
The length of time that he remained in a family depended on the number of school children in that house, and, perhaps to his own discomfort, the longer stay was made where there was the most children. In the remembrance of some of the town's aged citizens the above forms were carried on. Schools were kept in the houses, and, at one time, in an old loft in what was then the upper apartment of Joshua Walker's store. 

The first school building erected in town was on the Indian River road, near the site of Obed Lamson's residence. This house was afterwards used for storage purposes. The second building for school purposes stood at Sawyer's Cove, near the site of James Bryant's home. This was built by the town and district. The town gave $100 for its erection, providing that it should be used for town meetings. The Union Vestry at West Jonesport was the third school building erected in town. This was done in 1848 by Abraham McKenzie, who received $400 for his work. 

The scholars in these schools had books, such as they were, if they were able to purchase them. Hon. D. J. Sawyer informs the writer that at one time, when on the school committee, he visited one of the island schools, and there found a pupil with only a farmer's almanac from which to study. Thanks to the present "Free Book System," the pupil, rich or poor, is supplied alike. Our town was one of the first in this section of Maine to adopt this much needed system. Great credit is due to the persistent labors of Mrs. D. J. Sawyer, who was largely instrumental in bringing this 
about. The sad death of this beloved woman and friend, which occurred on July 2d, 1902, took away the town's most ardent educational promoter. Mention should also be made of her husband, Hon. D. J. Sawyer, who has worked unceasingly in the interests of the schools in town. 

From this small beginning our town has its present schools, and justly proud and thankful ought she to be for the marked advancement that has been made. Not many towns of her size can boast of a better regulated system, or more tasty school buildings. A good idea of their present condition may be gathered from the following: The town of Jonesport is divided into ten school districts, with a total of 16 common schools of lower grade, and one high school. The number of scholers in town drawing school money is 906. Each of these schools are graded, thanks to the earnest and successful labors of the town's present superintendent, Mrs. B. B. Mansfield, supported in every move by the committee, W. L. Noyes, Rev. T. B. Hatt and Dr. H. A. Mansfield. For these schools competent in- structors are secured. Within the last two years many improvements have been made on the school buildings. Most of them are now supplied with a school bell and flag. 

Two modern Grammar school buildings, the Lincoln, at West Jonesport, and the Washington at the Lower Village, have been lately erected at a cost of about $10,000. The town is to erect during the summer a one-story school house at Head Harbor, and a two story structure at Alley's Bay. 

Prior to 1894 there was no free High School in town. For a long time the citizens had felt the need of such an institution, for their children who wished to go to college were compelled to leave the town to fit themselves for entrance. It was in the spring of 1893 that the first potent move was made to establish such an advanced school of learning. At that annual town meeting an article was put in the warrant asking that a Free High School be established, and that the town, in conjunction with the Masonic Lodge, erect a building for its use. Each was to pay one-half of the cost of construction. The town was to occupy the first floor, and furnish it at her own expense, and the Masons were to use the upper apartment, which they should furnish. This article was accepted, and $1,500 was appropriated for the erection of the building. 

In the fall of 1894, the building having been completed, the first term of High School opened, with Mr. Horsman, a graduate of Bowdoin College, at its head. The next year Harry Wilbur, of the same college, assumed the principal-ship, and remained with this institution several years. The first graduation occurred in the spring of 1896, when eight students received diplomas. Then in one year the school had three teachers, Clarence Parks, Lincoln Roys and Harry Wilbur. The next principal was J. D. Murphy, a graduate of Williams College. Mr. Murphy was the first to have an assistant in the school, Miss Annie S. Morrison, a graduate of Smith College, occupying that position. In 1904 the present principal, Henry G. Clement of Gorham, Maine, a graduate of Bowdoin College, assumed charge of this school. His assistant is Miss Betsey A. Nickels of Cherryfield, a Colby College graduate. Both of these instructors have proved themselves efficient in their positions. The school has an attendance of about fifty students. College Preparatory and English courses are instituted in the school, from which a student is granted a diploma, having finished the course of study with a rank of 75 or more, on a scale of 100. This institution, although in its infancy, gives promise of a very useful career. The town is doing everything possible to make it one of the best of its class. 

From 1910 Jonesport Town Report:

School Report. To the Citizens of Jonesport: GENTLEMEN :—I respectfully submit to you the following report of the condition, progress and needs of the schools of Jonesport. There are eighteen schools in our town and we employ twenty-one teachers. It is not an easy task to find twenty-one teachers each of whom can give perfect satisfaction. We have provided you with the best we could get for the wages paid and I am not boasting when I say that we have as competent a corps of teachers as any town in our county. It is unwise to make the appropriations such that we cannot keep good teachers when we have tested them and found them necessary to our schools. At the close of this report I have given according to my best judgment and experience the amounts needed in each department of school work, and for the good of your boys and girls, do not appropriate any less. Our rural and island schools have clone excellent work. They are well graded and the teachers have been interested, patient and faithful in their labors. During the winter term a new bell was placed in the belfry of the H. H. Island building, the money being earned by the pupils, their parents and friends assisted by Mrs. Lena R. Andrews who has always been deeply interested in the school. In behalf of the school children we thank Mrs. Andrews for her aid. At the close of the fall term a concert was given and a large dictionary purchased with the proceeds. During this year an earnest effort should be made to get a bell for the building at Alley's Bay; the pupils are willing, so are their parents, and "Where there's a will there's a way." The grammar and primary rooms at Beals were given a coat 15 of paint at the beginning of the fall term, adding much to their attractiveness. The grammar school pupils purchased two splendid maps last spring term with their League money. The two schools gave a fine concert at the close of the fall term and have several dollars in their treasury. The house at Late Island was painted and is in good condition. The school is larger than it has been for several years and both teacher and pupils have done excellent work. The schools at Roque Island and the Light House, although small, are much interested in their work and are very appreciative of their part of our school funds. The school at Monsapec is active and interested in school work. They have sufficient money to paper their room, which with other repairs will make it neat and attractive. At the Lower Bay the Sunday school papered the schoolroom and Air. Noyes had it painted, new windows put in and a hard wood floor laid. The pupils are very studious. There are ten pupils in the Indian River school. The attendance has been excellent and the work well done. Should the school be smaller at any time during the coming year, I recommend that the pupils be conveyed to the West Jonesport schools as the law provides. The school at Kelleys Point has made steady progress and at this time is in excellent condition. Relieving the crowded conditions of the village primary schools at the beginning of the fall term has proved highly satisfactory. The pupils of all the village schools have been interested and attentive and made excellent progress. The teachers quickly adapted themselves to the new conditions and have labored faithfully for the advancement of the schools. I recommend that all children entering the primary school for the first time, enter at the beginning of the fall term when the 3rd grade is passed into the intermediate rooms. This will prevent crowding the primary schools during the spring term. The fine new flag and pole purchased by Lincoln League of the W. Jonesport grammar school deserves special mention and should serve to arouse feelings of love and loyalty for the school and its work. The pupils of the Jonesport grammar, intermediate and primary schools have by contributions and concerts paid for 16 musical instruction for the year. The children are very grateful to Mrs. Brown for making the lesson fee so small that they were able to spend one hour a week under her efficient instruction. Our high school registers 61 students. I think I am correct in stating that this is the largest number enrolled since its organization. Every seat is occupied. The teachers have given practically all their time to school work. The students are interested in their studies and a very large majority get excellent rank. Under the new school laws high schools are classed as A, B and C. Schools in classes A and B will receive $500 State aid for 1910 instead of $250 as formerly, provided that the appropriation, courses of study and laboratory equipment are such as the law requires. Our appropriation last year meets the requirement, our courses of study have been approved by the State Superintendent of Schools, and we hold a certificate from him making us in class A schools. If we remain in this class we must enlarge our laboratory and equip it as the law requires. If you will appropriate the sums asked for we shall receive $500 from the State next December. It will certainly be a good investment both financially and educationally. APPROPRIATIONS NEEDED FOR ICjIO. The amount needed for common schools will seem very ll to those unacquainted with the change in the law governing the State mill tax. By this change Jonesport will receive about $1,000 more than last year. Common schools $600 00 School books 300 00 School supplies 75.00 Repairs 500.00 Cleaning 50.00 High school 850.00 High school laboratory 125.00 MRS. D. D. KELLEY, Superintendent

Beals Historical Society, PO Box 280, Beals ME 04611

  • c-facebook